The Blood Money Psychology

The Blood Money Psychology

Emaka grew up in a village in Enugu. One day, his childhood friend returned from Lagos with the latest car.

Emeka wanted to be rich, too. So, he begged his friend to take him to Lagos so that he can hustle and make his own money.

On reaching Lagos, it turns out that his wealthy friend was an occultic man and he convinced him to join the occult group. Emeka was resistant at first, but after some more persuasions, he succumbed and used his father, mother, or somebody he loved dearly for rituals. He became extremely wealthy.

If you are a Nigerian born in the early and mid-90s, I bet you can relate to this story.

I grew up with two terrible mindsets about money.

The first one was influenced by Nollywood, and it is that every wealthy person belongs to an occultic group.

Where I spend the early part of my life, seeing an extremely wealthy person was a privilege we could not afford. My definition of wealth was any family who could afford a generator, television, and maybe a fancy car (Fancy – referring to any other vehicle apart from 504 or 505 Peugeot).

Well, some of us were not privileged to be part of that league. So, we usually sneak out at night to stood by the window to see movies. If we were lucky enough, they would open their curtain or, better still, allow you to go in (if you are a friend to the family).

The type of movies we watched those days were full of something like my introductory story.

These stereotyped storylines were made for entertaining, but the unintended consequences were that it was gradually implanting on my innocent, naive, and young mind, a wrong perspective about wealth.

This kind of plot was so consistent in Nollywood movies that it became so real to me. So much so that I began to see any good car on the road as a product of ‘blood money.’

The second mindset was influenced by a church I attended for six months after my secondary School while I was doing computer training.

We were doing a series of Bible studies on the end time, and what I understood then was that all the world’s wealthiest people are potential antichrist.

So, as far as I was concerned, once you are a billionaire, you have pitched your tent with the devil.

It was so serious that I concluded that it’s impossible to be wealthy and influential and yet be part of the Kingdom.

What those mindsets did to me was to take away my confidence, becoming rich. I told myself, “since I wouldn’t want to use my parents or siblings for ritual and I do not want to be an antichrist, the best thing is to just remain in the middle class. After all, godliness and contentment is a great gain.

The good news is all those mindsets have changed because I realized they weren’t true. Thanks to the balanced doctrines of FCS KSU and Chapel of Restoration. My first two years in the University were more of a mindset reform and spiritual transformation than they were of Academics.

I also come to learn that an average Igbo man who migrated from his village to Lagos does not have to be an occultic member to make money. Most of them (if any) do not belong to any cult at all. Their wealth is a product of determination, commitment, and divine empowerment.

I am a firm believer in the fact that God gives the power to create wealth, and a man can yield to him and build capacity to lend to nations. That’s the scripture.

In case you are still having similar mindsets about wealth as I had before, I want you to know that it’s not your fault. We are all products of our nature (genetic make-up) and nurture (environment). You may not be able to change your nature but can unlearn everything you learned from your environment that is toxic. That’s what life is all about, learning, learning, and relearning.

Guess what, I can help you with it. I will be writing a series of posts about how you can develop a healthy mindset about money in August. You can subscribe to the series for free at https://bit.ly/MMwithnick

Stay tuned!
#Growwithnick